FOURTEEN MOVIES: for a C.19 Shutdown

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day One. SUNSET BOULEVARD 1950

90260914_3273889432639802_8668741782978166784_o

Joe Gillis: “You used to be big.”

Norma Desmond: “I am big. It’s the pictures that got small.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Two: GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD LUCK [2005]

2005-good_night_and_good_luck-3

Ed Murrow: “If none of us had ever read a dangerous book or had a friend who was different, never joined an organization that advocated change, we’d all be just the kind of people Joe McCarthy wants.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Three: THE BIG LEBOWSKI [1998]

91PfUyEzvAL._AC_SL1500_

Dude: “This is a very complicated case Maude. You know, a lotta ins, a lotta outs, lotta what-have-yous.”

Stranger:“Do you have to use so many cuss words?”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Four: SEANCE ON A WET AFTERNOON (1964)

MV5BMzNmYjEzOGYtYzRkNy00N2VmLTg0YzQtOWQ3YTRjOTAzOTc1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTg2NjYzOA@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,636,1000_AL_

Myra Savage: “What we are doing is a means to an end. Now you agree with the end, don’t you? Well then you must agree with the means! You can’t have one without the other.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Five: THE CONVERSATION [1974]

ba9f781693ebba16f1244d3a084a6552

Harry Caul: “I’ve been involved in some work that I think, I think will be used to hurt these two young people. It’s happened to me before.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day six: THE GENERAL [1926]

TheGeneral

Johnnie Gray: “If you lose this war don’t blame me.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day seven: BEFORE SUNSET [2004]

51RHl3wL0ZL._AC_

Celine: “I guess when you’re young, you just believe there’ll be many people with whom you’ll connect with. Later in life, you realise it only happens a few times.” 

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Eight: KES [1969]

51Mi0crIkYL._AC_

Billy Caspar: “It’s fierce, an’ it’s wild, an’ it’s not bothered about anybody, not even about me right. And that’s why it’s great.” …

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Nine: SULLIVAN’S TRAVELS [1941]

image

Sullivan: “I want this picture to be a commentary on modern conditions, stark realism, the problems that confront the average man.”
Studio Boss: “But with a little sex.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Ten: CHINATOWN [1974]

chinatown

Noah Cross: “You may think you know what you’re dealing with, but, believe me, you don’t.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Eleven: THE LIVES OF OTHERS [2006]

lives of others - cinema quad movie poster (2).jpg

Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler: “Do you even know what the Stasi is?”

Young Child: “Yes. My dad says they’re bad men who put people in prison.”

Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler: “I see. What is the name of your…” [pauses]

.

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Twelve THE AMERICAN FRIEND [1977]

ea3fc870ce6138e5a1521348f1a02cf7

Jonathan Zimmermann: “Why did you spread this rumour that I am with one foot in the grave?”

Tom Ripley: “That day we were introduced at the auction? You said, ‘I’ve heard of you.’ You said that in a very nasty way.”

Jonathan Zimmermann “That was all?”

Tom Ripley: “Isn’t that enough?”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Thirteen: HIGH HOPES [1988]

hopes

Martin: “Your best bet is to form yourself a little company. Let all the other wallies do the dirty work while you sit in happy valley collecting the dosh.”

Cyril: “I wouldn’t do that on principle.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Fourteen: BICYCLE THIEVES [1948]

images-w1400

Antonio: “I’ve been cursed since the day I was born.”

Movies across 14 Days of Self-Isolation. 

Day Fifteen:

Well, you can’t be too careful. So during an extra day of voluntary quarantine, why not feast your eyes on diamonds -courtesy of Powell and Pressburger. 

One [or all] from:

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP [1943] 

the-life-and-death-of-colonel-blimp-md-web

A CANTERBURY TALE [1944]

38349

I KNOW WHERE I AM GOING [1945]

CO8fhJazSe2g825mTA0hbuLhjrFanC_large

A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH [1946]

AMOLAD-quad

THE RED SHOES [1948]

il_fullxfull.1855054103_hfc5

 

Bad Housekeeping:

Tags

, , , , , , ,

 ‘The Housekeeper’ by Morna Regan.

Production by the Attic Players, Newcastle Emlyn  Feb. 28th, 2020

87857634_2655007387943933_958652707810312192_n

In the Columbia Spectator of August 23, 2013, Agnieszka Sablinska described Morna Regan’s ‘The Housekeeper’ as “30 minutes of a terrifyingly distasteful attempt at comedy involving an old man with Huntington’s disease”. I can only suggest that that show had gone badly wrong in New York and that she should have instead attended the Attic Theatre’s production in Newcastle Emlyn last evening.

After delivering another finely crafted comedy in December for us to enjoy during those now golden hours before we fell over the cliff of the General Election result, the Attic Players earned the right to present much darker and challenging fare last night.

‘The Housekeeper’ introduces itself as a faintly surreal comedy, with a figure wearing a head torch cleaning a darkened room, confronted by another woman wielding a hammer. We are looking in on a house which is self-evidently too large for its current owner-occupiers and has been stormed by a stranger laden with sleeping bags for herself and her children who are in the car outside, waiting for their mother’s ‘all clear’. There follows a dialogue between the two on dispossession, poverty, inheritance and social worth. This claim to squatter’s rights may seem simplistic and twenty years ago would have played as farce. With homeless figures for the UK calculated by Shelter at 320,000 and rising, these arguments now require serious consideration.
Once homeowner Beth realises that interloper Mary is going nowhere else very soon, she realises that this desperate single parent may actually present an opportunity for her to escape from her own version of purgatory. Terms for Mary to earn the right to stay are negotiated. The price will be high. She is to be assigned the task of taking care of Hal, Beth’s husband. Act one ends with Beth on the threshold; finally in a position to leave her own fifteen year long emotionally frozen hell, from which money has failed to provide insulation.

The second act reveals the play’s deeper psychology. Mary’s fragile moral high ground is cruelly undermined by Hal. He wants to continue administering mental torture to his wife that she may share an equivalence of his physical suffering. Offering Mary a healthy inducement to exit his preferred status quo, she all too readily takes the bait -once the price is doubled and underwritten as “tax-free”. Beth exposes Hal’s ploy as just one more in a long line of financial scams. From that point, Mary is witness to the fallout from a desiccated marriage founded on finance and poisoned by a chromosome defection which has taken their only son. There are echoes here of Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Mamet’s meditations on the corrupting colours of money.

I tend to resist singling out Attic performers by name in reviews. This is a company devoted to presenting a collective best for their audience and should be considered as one unified team. However, last night, all three artists earned mention. They brought out all the humanity of their three flawed characters, through three flawless performances.

87160173_2642650692512936_7341012506673938432_o

One must hope that, for the sake of his family that John Franks doesn’t subscribe to the method acting school, because tonight he looked physically transformed; weak, ill and impotent. His performance rendered the references in the script to his body odour superfluous; the [metaphorical] reek of his carcass registered in the fifth row. This was a physical performance par excellence, but by no means a two-dimensional characterisation. Even a leftie might feel some sympathy for his Hal. Yes; once a financier with a chilling ethos “the only reason you and people like you are honest is that you’ve never had the opportunity to be anything else.” Now a broken spirit yet still sharp-witted man who knows exactly what it means to be entrapped in a body operating beyond his control. A flaccid bag of a man, leaking foul oaths and bodily fluids from all his orifices; but still able to hold the guilt of condemning his son to an accelerated version of the disease now claiming his own bones. Extraordinary.

83103400_2585429861568353_1062797835012931584_o

Melanie Davies can always be relied upon to change emotional gear with smooth precision. Her initial outward persona is unsympathetic, patronising and spiteful. her Beth becomes, with a costume change, a physically transformed woman. Her now elegant bearing as she prepares to leave Hal, hints at what she may have made of herself if only she could have had the courage and spine to escape her marriage vows and the ties of social convention years earlier. Instead, she has chosen to suffer the humiliations of her husband’s past affairs and his mental cruelty for money and security. She too has her price. As usual, Ms Davies is able to convey so much more than her scripted words offer us.
86937730_2633590790085593_6640243271836631040_o

Carrying the role as the outside agency which disrupts the mechanism of this decaying yet stable relationship, Claire Woolley is assigned the onerous role of onstage witness to events for much of the second act. When you know that the two active players in a passage of action are going to be faultless, one is able to watch more closely the passive third actor. The timing and pitch of Ms. Woolly’s reactions to the scene unfolding before her was timed and pitched to perfection throughout.

Excellent direction through this challenging material was provided by Semele Xerri.
84351174_2600735860037753_7414507772294725632_n

I left the Attic last evening evening feeling emotionally drained rather than uplifted. I think the majority of the audience felt the same. There are some very funny lines in ‘Housekeeper’, but the responsive viewer is quickly ambushed by a rapid rejoinder which strangles the laughter and creates a feeling of disquiet. However, I did feel that I had witnessed something quite profound and illuminating. For this is what theatre -well played theatre, can present to the audience fortunate enough to have been present on that night. As a result of this latest Attic offering, I resolve never to get old and decrepit, or if I have to, at least show a little common decency as I am doing it…
Glenn Ibbitson Feb. 29th 2020

The Surveillers and the Surveilled: more Moth Watercolours

Tags

, , , , , , ,

Black RusticLa Vigile Rustica Nera

67741568_2782970738398343_2565900087825793024_oJulia

68286451_2782970751731675_8729919318617227264_oThe Writer

52797000_2500574306637989_1828467680709967872_nThe Inverted Character

early grey2Tenniel

SpectacleSpectacle

ObsessionThe Obsessive

FrostedMan bThe Frosted Man

Faded GloryFaded Glory

MinorThe Minor

Sentinell’Agent Provocateur

SentrySelf Portrait in a Minor key

SilverYLong Sight

Sleeper WatchesThe Dissident

WatchingWatching and Waiting

WatchmanWatchman

Woman under Grey ArchesWoman behind Grey Arches

All watercolour on paper  all 61x43cm except;

La Vigile Rustica Nera: 50x35cm

Self -Portrait in a Minor Key: 43×30.5cm

Faded Glory: 51x30cm

l’Agent Provocateur: 43.5x31cm

ORIEL Q NARBERTH “GO FIGURE”

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

fb2fb4fb7fb9fb10fb15fb16fb18fb34
Show of Figurative art promising an exciting and vibrant mixed exhibition of paintings, sculpture & ceramics by Oriel Q members on the “Figurative” theme; referencing the real world and particularly to the human figure.’

Exhibition  runs until March 21st.

More information can be found on the gallery website :
www.orielqnarberth.com Gallery Opening times are 10 to 4.00 from Tuesday to Saturdays .The gallery is on 2nd floor of the Queens Hall.

For Exhibition info, ideas and submissions, we’d love to hear from you on info@orielqnarberth.com or contact the gallery manager Harry Addyman on 07917292774. Why not become a member for £20 a year? then you will receive our monthly QReport with updated news and information. Our Member Secretary 2020 is Liz Tobin

A Magnificent Seven

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

Seven illuminating reads which I would recommend unreservedly. In no particular order, they are:

70948348_2876915435670539_4663869939793264640_o

Homage to Catalonia: George Orwell

71023379_2870684366293646_1845981642515021824_o

Spies: Michael Frayn

71107023_2874809302547819_4876907524629987328_o

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists: Robert Tressell

71391615_2872756906086392_7793216371885604864_o

The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman: Laurence Sterne71542640_2881050331923716_1795088324461854720_o

The World Without Us: Alan Weisman

A1ozLrYs7UL

The Floating Egg; Episodes in the Making of Geology: Roger Osborne

71274064_2869166323112117_9215308536404246528_oForced Into Glory: Lerone Bennett Jr.

The Vigilant Black Rustic

Tags

, , , , , , ,

Black Rustic

La Vigile Rustica Nera: watercolour on paper 50x35cm

Painted for exhibition with the Royal Watercolour Society of Wales at the invitation of  the Associazione Italiana Acquerellisti.
Galleria Torre Civica, Genoa, Liguria, Italy.
April 4th to May 17th 2020

Room 103 @Oxford University

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Room 103: a visual tribute to George Orwell was selected to exhibit the influence the writer has on contemporary visual art at

NINETEEN EIGHTY FOUR NOW

10-17 Oct. 2019 at Oxford University

Organised by Dr. Lisa Mullen and Dr. David Dwan

Sultan Nazrin Shah centre

fb1Glenn Ibbitsonfb2Glenn Ibbitson Alan Perguseyfb3

Oct. 10th: Carole Cadwalladr and Fintan O’Toole in fine, provocative form at this evening’s talk ORWELL AND JOURNALISM at The Sultan Nazrin Shah Centre, Worcester College, Oxford University. Paintings and video screening in foyer.

fb Orwell

Programme cover and introduction for

SYMPOSIUM: NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR NOW 11 October 2019 Nash Building, Worcester College, Oxford

Papers presented by Jean Seaton, Joshua Dienstag, Anna Vaninskaya, Dorian Lynskey, Joanna Kavenna, Victoria Bateman, Nathan Wadell and Greg Claeys.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Glenn Ibbitson bGlenn Ibbitson a

ROOM 103 @ the Foyer of the English Faculty Building, Manor Road, OX1 3QU.

10-17th October.

showing with Paul Steffan Jones, Garry Barker, Tony Baker, Nigel Pugh, Mark Elmore, Liam Ainscough, Alan Pergusey.